If the apple brand has been dismantling its old models for a few years to recover spare parts and recycle materials, it would like to move up a gear in this area. To combine economy with ecology?

This recycling of spare parts, the Cupertino company has implemented since 2016, and the presentation of Liam. No connection with the former singer of Oasis: it was a recycling robot, able to dismantle an iPhone to recover its battery, its screen, its shell, the drawer for the nanoSIM and the photo sensor.

As models and components have since changed, Liam has been replaced by Daisy. Located in the Apple factory in Austin, Texas, this new robot has enormous productivity, since it manages to de-bone 200 iPhones per hour. And he works 24 hours a day, because when you’re a robot, you don’t need a break to eat or go to the little corner. So that’s a pretty good average of 4,800 per day, and about 1.6 million iPhones per year. But above all, Daisy manages to extract from these old models no more and no less than 14 materials, then sent to subcontractors taking care of their cleaning. Apple’s long-term goal would therefore be to only offer 100% recycled iPhones.

Which may seem particularly complicated. Because if Daisy manages to recycle 1.6 million phones per year, Apple sold around 180 million iPhones in 2019. Daisy would therefore need to have a whole family of robots around to help her (and they could call Donald, Riri, Fifi or Loulou?) and hope to keep up. But above all, some experts believe that this is impossible, for the simple reason that the materials used in the manufacture of an iPhone are not all recyclable …

This is why the firm is thinking of recovering materials from other sectors for the manufacture of its iPhones, and adapting the Daisy robot to other industries, in particular the automobile, the batteries of electric cars requiring a lot of lithium. By creating this exchange of resources between different industries, Apple could therefore meet its long-term goal of only making iPhones with recycled materials. But the process should take a long time to be able to sustain demand, and should not be in place for several years …

Sources: Phonandroid, Phonearena, BFMTV, News 24